Friday, December 17, 2010

ProQuest Databases have new interface.



Our ProQuest Databases are wearing a new look. That new look will be on the following databases by late Dec. 17th, 2010. Take a look and do some searching. Some great databases for some great research.

Those databases with the new look are:

Criminal Justice Abstracts: This database abstracts and indexes journals, books, reports, dissertations and unpublished papers on criminology and related disciplines from around the world. Topics covered include crime trends, crime prevention and deterrence, juvenile delinquency, juvenile justice, police, courts, punishment and sentencing.

Ethnic NewsWatch: This database provides multicultural full-text titles directly from the presses of ethnic, minority and cultural groups, from 1970 to current.

GenderWatch: This is a database of unique and diverse publications that focus on how gender impacts a broad spectrum of subject areas. With its archival material, dating back to 1970 in some cases, GenderWatch is a repository of important historical perspectives on the evolution of the women's movement, men's studies, the transgendered community and the changes in gender roles over the years. Publications include scholarly journals, magazines, newspapers, newsletters, regional publications, books and NGO, government and special reports.

PsycArticles: This database offers full-text articles from over 50 journals published by the American Psychological Association, the APA Educational Publishing Foundation, the Canadian Psychological Association and Hogrefe & Huber. The database includes all material from the print journals. Many titles go back to volume 1, issue 1.

Sunday, December 12, 2010

LIBRARY HOURS -- WINTER BREAK 2011-2012



Saturday, Dec. 17 & Sunday, Dec. 18:  Library Closed

Monday, Dec. 19  to Thursday Dec. 22, 2011:  8:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Friday, Dec. 23, 2011 through  Monday, Jan 2, 2012:  Library Closed

Tuesday, Jan 3 to Friday, Jan 6: 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Saturday, Jan 7 & Sunday Jan 8: Library Closed

Monday, Jan. 9 to Friday, Jan. 13:  8:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Saturday, Jan 14 & Sunday, Jan 15:  Library Closed

Monday, Jan. 16 to Friday, Jan. 20: 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Saturday, Jan 21 & Sunday Jan 22: Library Closed

Beginning Mon. Jan 23, 2012 we will resume normal library hours

Monday - Thursday: 8:00 AM - Midnight

Friday 8:00 am - 6:00 PM

Saturday is 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Sunday is 1:30 - Midnight.

Friday, December 3, 2010

Archives displays Audubon Bird Folios

Library Audubon Collection
Our library has a collection of Audubon bird paintings from the Double Elephant Folios which Audubon published during his life time. 100 of the 431 pages have been photographed and put on a CD. That CD is playing in the collections room of the Archives on the 7th floor. The drawings and paintings can be seen in the Collections Room during Archive hours. For the 2010 Fall Semester the hours are: Monday closed: Tuesday 11-3, Wednesday & Friday 3-5:30, Thursday 11-5.

2012 Holiday Season From the Census Bureau. Facts and Figures.





The holiday season is a time for gathering and celebrating with friends and family, gift-giving, reflection and thanks. To commemorate this time of year, the U.S. Census Bureau presents the following holiday-related facts and figures from its collection of statistics.




Rush to the Stores

$27.2 billion


Retail sales by the nation’s department stores (including leased departments) in December 2010. This represented a 44 percent jump from the previous month (when retail sales, many holiday-related, registered $18.8 billion). No other month-to-month increase in department store sales last year was as large.






Other U.S. retailers with sizable jumps in sales between November and December 2010 were clothing stores (33 percent); radio, TV and other electronics stores (44 percent); sporting goods stores (58 percent); bookstores (92 percent); and jewelry stores (113 percent).


Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Service Sector Statistics http://www.census.gov/retail


Note: Leased departments are separately owned businesses operated as departments or concessions of other service establishments or of retail businesses, such as a separately owned shoeshine parlor in a barber shop, or a beauty shop in a department store. Also, retail sales and inventory estimates have not been adjusted to account for seasonal or pricing variations.


14%


The percentage of total 2010 sales for department stores (including leased departments) in December. For jewelry stores, the percentage was 20 percent.


Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Service Sector Statistics http://www.census.gov/retail






24%


The growth in inventories by our nation’s department stores (excluding leased departments) from Aug. 31 to Nov. 30, 2010. Thanks to the holiday crowds, inventories plummeted by 22 percent in December.


Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Service Sector Statistics


$34 billion


Value of retail sales by electronic shopping and mail-order houses in December 2010 ─ the highest total for any month last year.


Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Service Sector Statistics http://www.census.gov/retail


21,891


The number of electronic shopping and mail-order houses in business in 2009. These businesses, which employed 320,721 workers, are a popular source of holiday gifts (NAICS code 45411).


If you’re not sure where to do your shopping, choices of retail establishments abound: In 2009, there were 150,205 clothing and clothing accessories stores (NAICS code 448); 8,663 department stores (NAICS code 4521); 8,424 hobby, toy and game shops (NAICS code 45112); 27,738 gift, novelty and souvenir shops (NAICS code 45322); 21,628 sporting goods stores (NAICS code 45111); 24,973 jewelry stores (NAICS code 44831); and 9,390 book stores (NAICS code 451211) across the nation. The figures shown are for locations with paid employees and do not include nonemployer firms (i.e. firms with no paid employees).


NAICS – North American Industry Classification System
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns,
http://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/index.html


Christmas Trees and Decorations


$983 million


The value of U.S. imports of Christmas tree ornaments from China between January and September 2011. China was the leading country of origin for such items. Similarly, China was the leading foreign source of artificial Christmas trees shipped to the United States ($79.7 million worth) during the same period.


Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Statistics






Where the Toys are ... Made


88


Number of establishments around the country that primarily manufactured dolls and stuffed toys in 2009. California led the nation with 15 locations.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, NAICS code 339931,
http://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/index.html


579


The number of locations that primarily produced games, toys and children’s vehicles in 2009; they employed 7,858 workers. California led the nation with 98 establishments.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, NAICS code 339932, http://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/index.html


$2.5 billion


The value of U.S. toy imports including stuffed toys (including dolls), puzzles and electric trains from China between January and September 2011. China was the leading country of origin for stuffed toys coming into this country, as well as for a number of other popular holiday gifts.


These include roller skates ($24.6 million), sports footwear ($253.8 million) and basketballs


($38.9 million). China leads Thailand as the leading supplier of ice skates ($17.7 million versus $9.8 million), with Canada ranking third ($4.2 million).
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Statistics http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/www/


Holiday Names


Place names associated with the holiday season include North Pole, Alaska (population 2,117); Santa Claus, Ind. (2,481); Santa Claus, Ga. (165); Noel, Mo. (1,832); and — if you know about reindeer — the village of Rudolph, Wis. (439) and Dasher, Ga. (912). There is Snowflake, Ariz. (5,590) and a dozen places named Holly, including Holly Springs, Miss. (7,699) and Mount Holly, N.C. (13,656).
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census http://factfinder2.census.gov/


Hanukkah and Kwanzaa


50%


Proportion of the nation’s spuds produced in Idaho and Washington in 2010. Potato latkes are always a crowd pleaser during Hanukkah.
Source: National Agriculture Statistics Service http://usda01.library.cornell.edu/usda/current/Pota/Pota-09-29-2011.pdf

$1.5 billion


The value of product shipments of candles in 2009 by the nation’s manufacturers. Many of these candles are lit during Hanukkah and Kwanzaa celebrations.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Annual Survey of Manufacturers, NAICS Code 3399995; http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/DatasetMainPageServlet?_program=EAS&_submenuId=&_lang=en&_ts=


New Year’s Eve and Day
More than 315 million


The nation’s projected population as we ring in the New Year.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Estimates
http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.html

Thursday, December 2, 2010

Library resources for mobile devices

Have you ever needed to find a magazine or journal article in a library resource but couldn't find an available computer? You'll never have that problem again if you've got a web-enabled mobile device such as an Ipad touch, Droid, Iphone, etc. Simply point your device's web browser to http://library.edinboro.edu/mobile and search a selection of the library's full text journal databases.


NOTE: The service currently does not work with Verizon's "Mobile Web" web browser. We are working on a fix

Sunday, November 21, 2010

Login to Library Databases When Off Campus


If you are home or unable to log on to the Edinboro Campus Network, you can still access most of the Baron-Forness Library electronic databases. Once you are at the Library Homepage, click on Find Articles. Once on that page, click on Help with off campus access. This will lead you to a page which explaines how to log on to the databases. Edinboro students, staff and faculty can log on with their Edinboro University IDs by following the directions for the logon screen on the left. If you still have a problem accessing the databases call the Reference Desk, (814) 732-2253 or Circulation, (814) 732-2273.
Other library databases are under All E-Resources A-Z. If you wish to search by subject use E-Resources by Subject.

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

THANKSGIVING DAY, Nov. 22, 2012


 Nov. 22, 2012

In the fall of 1621, the Pilgrims, early settlers of Plymouth Colony, held a three-day feast to celebrate a bountiful harvest, an event many regard as the nation’s first Thanksgiving. Historians have also recorded ceremonies of thanks among other groups of European settlers in North America, including British colonists in Virginia in 1619. The legacy of thanks and the feast have survived the centuries, as the event became a national holiday in 1863 when President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed the last Thursday of November as a national day of thanksgiving. Later, President Franklin Roosevelt clarified that Thanksgiving should always be celebrated on the fourth Thursday of the month to encourage earlier holiday shopping, never on the occasional fifth Thursday.
 Where to Feast
114.7 million                    
Number of households across the nation — all potential gathering places for people to celebrate the holiday. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Housing Vacancy Survey, Table 3
<http://www.census.gov/housing/hvs/files/qtr312/q312press.pdf>



4
Number of places in the United States named after the holiday’s traditional main course. Turkey Creek, La., was the most populous in 2011, with 440 residents, followed by Turkey, Texas (424), Turkey, N.C. (295) and Turkey Creek, Ariz. (294). There are also 11 townships around the country with Turkey in their names, including three in Kansas. (Please note that the Turkey Creek, Ariz., population total pertains to the 2010 Census). Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 Population Estimates and American FactFinder, Table DP-1

9
Number of places and townships in the United States that are named Cranberry or some spelling variation of the acidic red berry (e.g., Cranbury, N.J.), a popular side dish at Thanksgiving. Cranberry Township (Butler County), Pa., was the most populous of these places in 2010, with 28,251 residents. Cranberry township (Venango County), Pa., was next (6,647).
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Estimates <http://www.census.gov/popest/data/cities/totals/2011/SUB-EST2011-4.html>

37
Number of places and townships in the United States named Plymouth, as in Plymouth Rock, the landing site of the first Pilgrims. Plymouth, Minn., is the most populous, with 71,561 residents in 2011; Plymouth, Mass., had 56,767. There is just one township in the United States named Pilgrim. Located in Dade County, Mo., its population was 131 in 2011. And then there is Mayflower, Ark., whose population was 2,298 in 2011, and Mayflower Village, Calif., whose population was 5,515 in 2010. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Estimates

Culinary Delights
64,380

The number of grocery stores in the United States in 2010. These establishments are expected to be extremely busy around Thanksgiving, as people prepare for their delightful meals.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, NAICS Code 44511

4,030

The number of baked goods stores in the United States in 2010 – a potential place to visit to purchase refreshing desserts. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, NAICS Code 445291<http://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/>

2,979

The number of fruit and vegetable markets in the United States in 2010 – a great place to find those holiday side dishes. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, NAICS Code 445230 <http://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/>


$12.1 million 

The value of U.S. imports of live turkeys from January through July of 2012, with 99.8 percent of them coming from Canada. When it comes to sweet potatoes, the Dominican Republic was the source of 45.3 percent (2.5 million) of total imports ($5.6 million). The United States ran a $9.1 million trade deficit in live turkeys during the period but had a surplus of $40.6 million in sweet potatoes.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Statistics

768 million pounds

The forecast for U.S. cranberry production in 2012. Wisconsin is estimated to lead all states in the production of cranberries, with 450 million pounds, followed by Massachusetts (estimated at 210 million).

New Jersey, Oregon and Washington are also estimated to have substantial production, ranging from 14 to 54 million pounds.
Source: USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service,
<http://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/results/6B80CDAE-0790-3727-81CB-41F979DAD0C8>

2.7 billion pounds

The total weight of sweet potatoes — another popular Thanksgiving side dish — produced by major sweet potato producing states in 2011. North Carolina (1.3 billion pounds) produced more sweet potatoes than any other state. Source: USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, <http://usda01.library.cornell.edu/usda/current/CropProdSu/CropProdSu-01-12-2012.pdf> Page 58

1.1 billion pounds

Total production of pumpkins in the major pumpkin-producing states in 2011. Illinois led the country by producing an estimated 520 million pounds of the vined orange gourd. Pumpkin patches in California, Pennsylvania and Ohio also provided lots of pumpkins: Each state produced at least 100 million pounds. The value of all pumpkins produced in the United States was $113 million. Source: USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service,
<http://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/results/C985DC07-3AE1-397C-A18C-F811DDD42D20>
<http://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/results/2FE80030-4016-3199-8AE9-9159BA83383B>

If you prefer cherry pie, you will be pleased to learn that the nation’s forecasted tart cherry production for 2012 totals 73.1 million pounds, down 68 percent from the 2011 production. Of this 2012 total, Pennsylvania led the country, producing an estimated 34 million pounds.
Source:  USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service,
<http://usda01.library.cornell.edu/usda/current/CherProd/CherProd-06-28-2012.pdf> Page 1

2.27 billion bushels

The forecasted total volume of wheat — the essential ingredient of bread, rolls and pie crust — produced in the United States in 2012. Kansas, Montana and North Dakota accounted for an estimated 40 percent of the nation’s wheat production. Source: USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, The following data can be accessed through this website.
<http://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/results/3A61136C-28A8-3C2A-A7EF-DA476776BD9F>

672,370 tons

The 2012 contracted production of snap (green) beans in the United States. Of this total, Wisconsin led all states (309,010 tons). Many Americans consider green bean casserole a traditional Thanksgiving dish. Source: USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service,
<http://usda01.library.cornell.edu/usda/current/Vege/Vege-09-06-2012.pdf> Page 16

254 million

The number of turkeys expected to be raised in the United States in 2012. That is up 2 percent from the number raised during 2011. Source: USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, <http://usda01.library.cornell.edu/usda/current/TurkRaisSu/TurkRaisSu-09-28-2012.pdf>


THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY LIBRARY HOURS



Thanksgiving Holiday
LIBRARY HOURS
 Tuesday 11/20 8:00AM – 12:00AM
Wednesday 11/21 8:00AM – 4:30PM
Thursday 11/22 – Saturday 11/24 Closed
Library Reopens
Sunday 11/25 1:30 PM – 10:00 PM
      

Monday, November 15, 2010

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY LIBRARY HOURS

LIBRARY HOURS
Thanksgiving Holiday

Tuesday 11/22 -- 8 am to Midnight
Wednesday 11/23 -- 8 am to 4:30 pm
Thursday 11/24 to Saturday 11/26 Closed
Sunday 11/27 -- 1:30 pm to 10 pm

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

SWAMPLANDIA choice for University Book Club discussion on Dec. 6.

The Edinboro University Book Discussion Group will next meet on Tuesday December 6 from 7:15 to 8:15.  We will meet high above the campus in Baron-Forness 715 to discuss the book Swamplandia by Karen Russell.  All are welcome to attend. 

From the celebrated twenty-nine-year-old author of the everywhere-heralded short-story collection St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves (“How I wish these were my own words, instead of the breakneck demon writer Karen Russell’s . . . Run for your life. This girl is on fire”—Los Angeles Times Book Review) comes a blazingly original debut novel that takes us back to the swamps of the Florida Everglades, and introduces us to Ava Bigtree, an unforgettable young heroine.

The Bigtree alligator-wrestling dynasty is in decline, and Swamplandia!, their island home and gator-wrestling theme park, formerly #1 in the region, is swiftly being encroached upon by a fearsome and sophisticated competitor called the World of Darkness. Ava’s mother, the park’s indomitable headliner, has just died; her sister, Ossie, has fallen in love with a spooky character known as the Dredgeman, who may or may not be an actual ghost; and her brilliant big brother, Kiwi, who dreams of becoming a scholar, has just defected to the World of Darkness in a last-ditch effort to keep their family business from going under. Ava’s father, affectionately known as Chief Bigtree, is AWOL; and that leaves Ava, a resourceful but terrified thirteen, to manage ninety-eight gators and the vast, inscrutable landscape of her own grief.

Against a backdrop of hauntingly fecund plant life animated by ancient lizards and lawless hungers, Karen Russell has written an utterly singular novel about a family’s struggle to stay afloat in a world that is inexorably sinking. An arrestingly beautiful and inventive work from a vibrant new voice in fiction.

Sunday, November 7, 2010

Universtiy Book Club reading Pat Barker's Regeneration for November Meeting.

The Edinboro University Book Club will be reading Regeneration by Pat Barker for their November meeting.  The club will meet on Tuesday, November 8, from 7:15 to 8:15 high above the Baron-Forness Library in Room 715.

Regeneration, one in Pat Barker's series of novels confronting the psychological effects of World War I, focuses on treatment methods during the war and the story of a decorated English officer sent to a military hospital after publicly declaring he will no longer fight. Yet the novel is much more. Written in sparse prose that is shockingly clear -- the descriptions of electronic treatments are particularly harrowing -- it combines real-life characters and events with fictional ones in a work that examines the insanity of war like no other. Barker also weaves in issues of class and politics in this compactly powerful book. Other books in the series include The Eye in the Door and the Booker Award winner The Ghost Road    

Noverber -- AMERICAN INDIAN MONTH

American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month: November 2011



The first American Indian Day was celebrated in May 1916 in New York. Red Fox James, a Blackfeet Indian, rode horseback from state to state, getting endorsements from 24 state governments, to have a day to honor American Indians. In 1990, President George H.W. Bush signed a joint congressional resolution designating November 1990 as “National American Indian Heritage Month.” Similar proclamations have been issued every year since 1994. This Facts for Features presents data for American Indians and Alaska Natives, as this is one of the six major race categories.

Red Fox James






Note: Unless otherwise specified, the data in the “Population” section refer to the population who reported a race alone or in combination with one or more other races.


                                                                              
Population        


5.2 million
As of the 2010 Census, the nation’s population of American Indians and Alaska Natives, including those of more than one race. They made up 1.7 percent of the total population. Of this total, 2.9 million were American Indian and Alaska Native only, and 2.3 million were American Indian and Alaska Native in combination with one or more other races.
Source: 2010 Census Brief: Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin
http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-02.pdf


8.6 million
The projected population of American Indians and Alaska Natives, including those of more than one race, on July 1, 2050. They would comprise 2 percent of the total population.Source: Population projections http://www.census.gov/population/www/projections/summarytables.html


1.1 million
Increase in the nation’s American Indian and Alaska Native population between the 2000 Census and 2010 Census. The population of this group increased by 26.7 percent during this period compared with the overall population growth of 9.7 percent.
Source: Census 2000 Brief: Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin
and 2010 Census Brief: Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin http://www.census.gov/prod/2001pubs/c2kbr01-1.pdf


723,225
The American Indian and Alaska Native population in California as of the 2010 Census. California was followed by Oklahoma (482,760) and Arizona (353,386).
Source: 2010 Census Summary File 1, Table QT-P5


15
Number of states with more than 100,000 American Indian and Alaska Native residents as of the 2010 Census. These states were California, Oklahoma, Arizona, Texas, New York, New Mexico, Washington, North Carolina, Florida, Michigan, Alaska, Oregon, Colorado, Minnesota and Illinois.
Source: 2010 Census Summary File 1, Table QT-P5


19.5%
The proportion of Alaska’s population identified as American Indian and Alaska Native as of
the 2010 Census, the highest rate for this race group of any state. Alaska was followed by Oklahoma (12.9 percent), New Mexico (10.7 percent) and South Dakota (10.1 percent).
Source: 2010 Census Summary File 1, Table QT-P5

29.0
Median age as of April 1, 2010, in years, for those who are American Indian and Alaska Native, and no other race. This compares with a median age of 37.2 for the population as a whole.
Source: Intercensal population estimates and 2010 Census Demographic Profile



Reservations


334
Number of federal and state recognized American Indian reservations in 2010. This total excludes Hawaiian Homelands. All in all, there are 617 American Indian legal and statistical areas for which the Census Bureau provides data.
Source: Census Bureau Geography Division


22%
Percentage of American Indians and Alaska Natives, alone or in combination, who lived in American Indian areas or Alaska Native Village Statistical Areas. These American Indian areas include federal American Indian reservations and/or off-reservation trust lands, Oklahoma tribal statistical areas, tribal designated statistical areas, state American Indian reservations, and state designated American Indian statistical areas.
Source: 2010 Census Summary File 1

Tribes

565
Number of federally-recognized Indian tribes.
Source: Federal Register: Oct. 1, 2010, and Oct. 27, 2010
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/biaind.pdf
http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2010/pdf/2010-27138.pdf


100,000+
In the 2010 Census, the tribal groupings with 100,000 or more responses for the American Indian and Alaska Native alone-or-in-any combination population were Cherokee (819,105), Navajo (332,129), Choctaw (195,764), Mexican American Indian (175,494), Chippewa (170,742), Sioux (170,110), Apache (111,810), and Blackfeet (105,304).
Source: 2010 Census Summary File 1, Table PCT3

Families

557,185
The number of American Indian and Alaska Native families in 2010. Of these, 57 percent were married-couple families, including those with children.
Source: 2010 American Community Survey for the American Indian and Alaska Native alone population  http://factfinder2.census.gov/


29.6 and 26.8 years old
Median age at first marriage for American Indian and Alaska Native men and women age 15 to 54, respectively, in 2010. For the population as a whole in this age range, the respective numbers were 28.7 and 26.7 years. The difference in the median age at first marriage between American Indian and Alaska Native women and women overall is not statistically significant.
Source: 2010 American Community Survey for the American Indian and Alaska Native alone population http://factfinder2.census.gov/


Housing

54%
The percentage of American Indian and Alaska Native householders who owned their own home in 2010. This is compared with 65 percent of the overall population.
Source: 2010 American Community Survey for the American Indian and Alaska Native alone population  http://factfinder2.census.gov/


Languages

28%
Percentage of American Indians and Alaska Natives 5 and older who spoke a language other than English at home, compared with 21 percent for the nation as a whole.
Source: 2010 American Community Survey for the American Indian and Alaska Native alone population  http://factfinder2.census.gov/


73%
Percentage of residents of the Navajo Nation Reservation and Off-Reservation Trust Land, Ariz.-N.M.-Utah, age 5 and older who spoke a language other than English at home.
Source: 2007-2009 American Community Survey  http://factfinder.census.gov/


Education


77%
The percentage of American Indians and Alaska Natives 25 and older who had at least a high school diploma, GED or alternative credential. Also, 13 percent obtained a bachelor’s degree or higher. In comparison, the overall population had 86 percent with a high school diploma and 28 percent with a bachelor’s degree or higher.
Source: 2010 American Community Survey for the American Indian and Alaska Native alone population  http://factfinder2.census.gov/


41%
Among American Indians and Alaska Natives 25 and older who have a bachelor’s degree, the percentage whose degree is in science and engineering, or related fields. This compares with
44 percent for all people 25 and older with this level of education.
Source: 2010 American Community Survey for the American Indian and Alaska Native alone population  http://factfinder2.census.gov/


67,644
Number of American Indians and Alaska Natives 25 and older who had a graduate or professional degree.
Source: 2010 American Community Survey for the American Indian and Alaska Native alone population  http://factfinder2.census.gov/


Veterans


156,515
The number of American Indian and Alaska Native veterans of the U.S. armed forces.
Source: 2010 American Community Survey for the American Indian and Alaska Native alone population  http://factfinder2.census.gov/

Sunday, October 31, 2010

Jefferson Education Society schedules GLOBAL FUTURES SUMMIT III, Erie, PA

Global Futures Summit III: Nov. 8-11;
Jefferson Education Society,
3207 State St.
Info: 459-8000 or http://www.jeserie.org/.
Lectures are $10 per person, or $15 with a guest. Speakers include:


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Thursday, November 10, 2011
Evening lecture: 7:30 p.m.
Michael J. Songer, J.D.
For over 20 years, Michael Songer has practiced technology law. His clients have included Viacom, Sprint, Lucasfilm, and Napster. His cases cover Internet Service Provider protections, defamation, weblogs, copyright and trademark infringements, and data theft. He teaches The Law of Cyberspace at Georgetown University and is a trial lawyer with Crowell & Moring LLP in Washington, D.C.
Speech: Blogs, Social Media, and Wikileaks: The First Amendment and the Internet
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Friday, November 11, 2011
Luncheon 12:00 p.m.
Joel Barker, Ph.D.
Joel Barker is perhaps the best known futurist in the world. His videos have been translated and seen by more than 100 million people. His book on paradigms is a standard text at universities worldwide. He also has shown the importance of corporate vision and leadership. Industry Week Magazine calls his work, "one of the most influential series of programs in the business world."
Speech: Innovation at the Verge: Exploring the Under-used Territory of New Ideas
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Friday, November 11, 2011
Evening lecture: 7:30 p.m.
Alice M. Rivlin, Ph.D.
Alice Rivlin was Director of the White House Office of Management in the first Clinton Administration. She also was the founding Director of the Congressional Budget Office and Vice-Chair of the Federal Reserve Board. Last year, she was named by President Obama to the Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform. She co-chaired the Bipartisan Policy Center's Task Force on Debt Reduction. She was named one of the greatest public servants of the last 25 years by the Council for Excellence in Government. She has taught at Harvard, George Mason, and The New School Universities. Currently, she teaches at the Public Policy Institute at Georgetown University and is a Senior Fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution.
Speech: Real Solutions for Reducing the National Deficit




©2011 The Jefferson Educational Society. All rights reserved.
3207 State Street, Erie PA 16508 (814)-459-8000

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Halloween, all sorts of STUFF (from the U.S. Census Bureau)


Oct. 31, 2011

The observance of Halloween, which dates back to Celtic rituals thousands of years ago, has long been associated with images of witches, ghosts and vampires. Over the years, Halloween customs and rituals have changed dramatically. Today, Halloween is celebrated many different ways, including wearing costumes, children trick or treating, carving pumpkins, and going to haunted houses and parties.

Trick or Treat!




41 million
The estimated number of potential trick-or-treaters in 2010 — children age 5 to 14 — across the United States. Of course, many other children — older than 14 and younger than 5 — also go trick-or-treating.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census,



116.7 million
Number of occupied housing units across the nation in 2010 — all potential stops for trick-or-treaters.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census,



92%
Percentage of households with residents who consider their neighborhood safe. In addition, 78 percent said there was no place within a mile of their homes where they would be afraid to walk alone at night.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Extended Measures of Well-Being: Living Conditions in the United States, 2005, Table 4,



Jack-o’-Lanterns and Pumpkin Pies




1.1 billion pounds
Pumpkin production by major pumpkin-producing states in 2010. Illinois produced an estimated 427 million pounds of the vined orange gourd. California, New York and Ohio were also major pumpkin-producing states, each with an estimate of more than 100 million pounds.
Source: USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service




Where to Spend Halloween?



Some places around the country that may put you in the Halloween mood are:

Transylvania County, N.C. (population 33,090)
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census,

Tombstone, Ariz. (population 1,380)
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census,

Pumpkin Center, N.C. (population 2,222); and Pumpkin Bend, Ark. (population 276)
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census,

Cape Fear in New Hanover County, N.C. (population 18,388); and Cape Fear in Chatham County, N.C. (population 1,323).
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census,

Skull Creek, Neb. (population 271)
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census,



Candy and Costumes


1,177
Number of U.S. manufacturing establishments that produced chocolate and cocoa products in 2009, employing 34,252 people. California led the nation in the number of chocolate and cocoa manufacturing establishments, with 135, followed by Pennsylvania, with 111.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns: 2009, NAICS codes (31132 & 31133),

409
Number of U.S. establishments that manufactured nonchocolate confectionary products in 2009. These establishments employed 16,974 people. California led the nation in this category, with 45 establishments.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns: 2009, NAICS code (31134), http://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/

24.7 pounds
Per capita consumption of candy by Americans in 2010.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Industrial Reports, Confectionery: 2010, Table 1,


1,719
Number of costume rental and formal wear establishments across the nation in 2009.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2009 County Business Patterns, NAICS code (53222),
http://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/


Editor’s note: The preceding data were collected from a variety of sources and may be subject to sampling variability and other sources of error.  Questions or comments should be directed to the Census Bureau’s Public Information Office: telephone: 301-763-3030; fax: 301-763-3762; or e-mail: .